Australian Flying Corps

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People of the Australian Flying Corps



Aces of the Australian Flying Corps

The Aces of the Australian Flying Corps. The Australian Flying Corps produced 43 Aces commonly recognized by modern day Australian historians. The Australian Flying Corps produced Aces in both the Middle Eastern theatre as well as the Western Front. The leading AFC aces were Arthur "Harry" Cobby, Roy "Bo" King in France and Ross "Hadji" Smith in the Palestinian Front.

Roll of Honour of the Australian Flying Corps

The Australian Flying Corps Roll of Honour. The Australian Flying Corps suffered over 300 deaths from an Australian Imperial Force Army Unit of approximately 3300. The ultimate goal for the Roll of Honour is to have a photo, details, biography as well as a photograph of the servicemen's grave.

Nominal Roll of the Australian Flying Corps

The Australian Flying Corps Nominal Roll. The Australian Imperial Force kept a tab of their numbers by conducting several Nominal Rolls. The Australian War Memorial has published the 1919 Nominal Roll call. The Nominal Roll on the Australian Flying Corps page is for the entries on the AIF Nominal Roll that are a part of the AFC, there are however many who are not recorded in the Nominal Roll or recorded incorrectly.

Australian Aces of the British Flying Services

Australian Aces of the Royal Flying Corps, Royal Naval Air Service and Royal Air Force. Several Australians either unable to get into the Australian Flying Corps or finding themselves in the British Isles at the outbreak of hostilities joined up with the Royal Flying Corps or Royal Naval Air Service. Most notable of these were aces such as Robert "Bob" Little, Australia's highest scoring ace and Stan "Breguet" Dallas. The Royal Flying Corps asked permission to recruit 200 AIF members in 1915, however after that initial recruitment which was allowed reluctantly, the AIF didn't allow any further recruitment by the RFC, preferring instead that AIF members volunteering for flying training go to the AFC.

New Zealand Aces of the British Flying Services

New Zealand Aces of the Royal Flying Corps, Royal Naval Air Service and Royal Air Force. Many New Zealanders found themselves in the same predicament as the Australians which wished to fly, though the New Zealanders had a choice of the AFC, RFC, RNAS and later the RAF to join. The leading Kiwi ace was Keith "Grid" Caldwell who flew with the RFC and RAF. The aces Herbert Watson and Carrick Paul are two examples of New Zealanders who joined the AFC. Unfortunately the New Zealand Military Forces didn't raise an indigenous Aviation Arm.




Australian Flying Corps : A Complete History of the Australian Flying Corps